HIGHLIGHTS IN BME

Researchers have packaged a widely used cancer drug into nanoparticles, more than doubling its effectiveness at destroying tumors. The drug paclitaxel has been used for decades to fight breast, ovarian, lung and other cancers. But its effectiveness has been limited by its small molecular size and insolubility in water—properties that allow the body to clear the drug too quickly, reducing its...

HIGHLIGHTS IN BME

In June 2015, microscopy and imaging systems company Leica Microsystems acquired Bioptigen, Inc., a company born from the Duke University Pratt School of Engineering. Formed in 2004, Bioptigen has become a leader in optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging technique that uses light to capture extremely high-resolution, three-dimensional pictures of the eye.

HIGHLIGHTS IN BME

In April of 2013, an exemplary senior at Yale University named Michele Dufault was killed just weeks away from graduation while working late at night on her senior thesis in the school’s student machine shop. Steve Earp, manager of the Pratt School of Engineering Student Machine Shop at Duke University, wants to make sure such tragedies never happen again.

HIGHLIGHTS IN BME

As the inaugural class of one of Sub-Saharan Africa’s first biomedical engineering (BME) programs celebrated its graduation in Kampala, Uganda this May, Duke professor William "Monty" Reichert cheered their success from Durham. Reichert had recently returned to Durham from Kampala, where he spent the 2014-2015 academic year as a Fulbright Scholar at Makerere University, helping ensure the success...

HIGHLIGHTS IN BME

In a move akin to adding chemical weapons to a firebomb, researchers at Duke University have devised a method for making a promising nanoscale cancer treatment even more deadly to tumors. The invention allows an extremely thin layer of hydrogels (think contact lenses) to be deposited on the surface of nanoshells -- particles about a hundred nanometers wide designed to absorb infrared light and...

Welcome to Duke BME

Consistently ranked as one of the top biomedical engineering programs in the nation, Duke BME combines a hands-on educational experience and an interdisciplinary research environment that prepares graduates to be leaders in integrating engineering and biology to detect and treat human diseases.

A unique aspect of the program is the integration of research and education. Over two-thirds of the undergraduates are involved in independent study research. The doctoral program offers students early immersion into research. Due to the proximity of the Medical School and Health System, collaborative projects provide opportunities for students to do research with Medical School faculty. BME faculty are actively involved in various Centers and Institutes throughout the University, providing a very rich research and educational environment. The Coulter Translational Research Fund provides support for promising research that has the potential to address an unmet clinical need.  

Current departmental research activities include biomechanics of cells and hard and soft tissues; injury biomechanics; biomolecular and tissue engineering; electrical activity of the heart; neural engineering; biomedical optics, biophotonics and ultrasound imaging systems

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